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Zooplankton of Oman Coastal Waters Zooplankton of Oman Coastal Waters

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Date added: 04/07/2014
Date modified: 04/07/2014
Filesize: 4.36 MB
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Zooplankton of Oman Coastal Waters
Sergey A. Piontkovski1*, Asila Al-Maawali2, Ward Al-Muna Al-Manthri1,
Khalid Al-Hashmi1, and Elena A. Popova3
1College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University
P.O. Box 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman
2 Marine Science Fisheries Centre, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth
P.O. Box 227, Sultanate of Oman
3Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas, 2 Nakhmov av., Crimea, Sevastopol

Monthly sampling during daytime was carried out in 2007-2011 at Bandar Al-Khyran (23.51oN, 58.72oE) which is the largest semi-enclosed bay on the southern end of the Sea of Oman with about 4 km2 in surface area and an average depth of 10 m. Zooplankton were represented by Copepoda (79%), Cladocera (9%), Oikopleuriddae (7%), Chaetognatha (3%), and Decapoda (~2%) comprising the major part of the total zooplankton abundance. Among copepods, 27 species constituted ~75% of total copepod abundance. Changes of copepod abundance have not had a pronounced seasonal pattern. Instead, a multiple peak structure in monthly fluctuations was observed, on the level of genera as well as the abundance of species. Amplitudes and timing of the copepod peak abundance were markedly different during the studied years.

Variability of dinoflagellates and diatoms in the surface waters of Muscat, Sea of Oman Variability of dinoflagellates and diatoms in the surface waters of Muscat, Sea of Oman

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Date added: 02/25/2015
Date modified: 02/25/2015
Filesize: 370.14 kB
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Variability of dinoflagellates and diatoms in the surface waters of Muscat, Sea of Oman: comparison between enclosed and open ecosystem
Khalid A Al-Hashmi(1)*, Joaquim Goes(2), Michael Claereboudt (1), Sergey A.
Piontkovski (1), Adnan Al-Azri (1) Sharon L Smith (3)

1-Khalid A Al-Hashmi* (Corresponding author); College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O.Box: 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman.khalid99@squ.edu.om
2-Joaquim Goes; Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA goesgoa@gmail.com
1-Michael Claereboudt; College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O.Box: 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman. michelc@squ.edu.om
1-Sergey A. Piontkovski; College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O.Box: 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman. spion@squ.edu.om
1-Adnan Al-AzriCollege of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O.Box: 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman. adnazri@squ.edu.om
3-Sharon L Smith;The Rosenstiel School, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker
Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 USA. sharon.smith@rsmas.miami.edu

We investigated the distribution patterns of phytoplankton species over a one year period (from April 2010 to February 2011) at an open ocean location off the coast of Muscat, Sea of Oman (OFF) and the other at Bandar Khayran (BK), a semi enclosed bay located downstream of the southeastward Sea of Oman coastal current. Although these two locations come under the influence of the semi-annually reversing monsoons, and experience nutrient influxes associated with the southwest (SWM, June-Sept.) and the northeast monsoons (NEM, Nov.-Feb.), they are hydrographically distinct. At both stations, a total of 133 phytoplankton taxa were identified and quantified over the sampling period. The two stations showed higher phytoplankton abundance, higher diversity and higher chlorophyll concentrations during the SWM and NEM seasons, a reflection of phytoplankton populations responding to injection of nutrients during these two seasons. Phytoplankton communities at both at BK and OFF were dominated by dinoflagellates and showed no significant differences in dinoflagellate community composition. In addition, no clear 138 Khalid A Al-Hashmi et al trend of dinoflagellate or diatom species succession was observed during the study period. Among the dinoflagellate population, Prorocentrum minimum,Gymnodinium sp., Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gymnodinium simplex and the mixotroph Noctiluca scintillans. On the other hand, Lauderia punctata, Bacteriastrum elongatum and Paralia moniliformis, Chaetoceros spp. Guinardia striata and Thalassiosira spp. were the most dominant diatoms.

The Omani shelf hypoxia and the warming Arabian Sea The Omani shelf hypoxia and the warming Arabian Sea

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Date added: 03/03/2015
Date modified: 03/03/2015
Filesize: 389.85 kB
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The Omani shelf hypoxia and the warming Arabian Sea
S.A. PIONTKOVSKI*† AND H.S. AL-OUFI‡
†Department of Marine Science and Fisheries, CAMS, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman; ‡Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth, P.O. 467, Muscat 113, Sultanate of Oman
Interdecadal changes in oxygen depletion, with a special reference to artisanal landings of large pelagic fishes, were analysed. Data from 53 expeditions incorporating 29,043 vertical profiles of temperature and 2114 of dissolved oxygen implied an increase in temperature of 1.2 °C over the past 50 years in the upper 30 m layer of sea water during the south-west (summer) monsoon. The thermal stratification of the water column increased and the oxycline shoaled from 153 m in the 1960s to 80 m in the 2000s. Concentration of dissolved oxygen <3.5 mL L−1 is known to induce symptoms of stress for many tropical pelagic fishes, compressing them within upper layers and
exposing them to fishery. The habitat compression by the Oman shelf hypoxia has two components: a seasonal oxycline shoaling and an interdecadal trend.

Subsurface algal blooms of the northwestern Arabian Sea Subsurface algal blooms of the northwestern Arabian Sea

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Date added: 03/06/2017
Date modified: 03/06/2017
Filesize: 1.76 MB
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Subsurface algal blooms of the northwestern Arabian Sea

Sergey A. Piontkovski1,*, Bastien Y. Queste2, Khalid A. Al-Hashmi1,
Aisha Al-Shaaibi1, Yulia V. Bryantseva3, Elena A. Popova4

1College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman
2Centre for Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
3M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, 2 Terechenkovskaya Str., Kiev 01030, Ukraine
4Institute of Marine Biological Research, 2 Nakhimov Prospect, P.O. Box 229011, Russia

ABSTRACT
In situ plankton sampling, combined with remotely sensed and ocean Seaglider
observations, provided insight into the termination of the winter monsoon bloom and subsequent evolution into a subsurface fluorescence maximum in the northwestern Arabian Sea. This sub - surface maximum gradually descended, presenting increased fluorescence between 25 and 55 m depth during the spring inter-monsoon season. Species diversity decreased by half within the deep fluorescence maximum relative to the bloom. The dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans dominated by biomass in all samples collected from the depth of the subsurface fluorescence maximum. We show that the subsurface algal bloom persists throughout inter-monsoon seasons,
linking algal blooms initiated during the southwest and northeast monsoons. In situ samples showed a net decrease in Noctiluca cell size, illustrating a shift towards a deep chlorophyll maximum adapted community, but did not exhibit any increases in chlorophyll-containing endo - symbionts. We propose that the plankton biomass and estimates of the northwestern Arabian Sea productivity are much greater than estimated previously through remote sensing observations, due to the persistence, intensity and vertical extent of the deep chlorophyll maximum which— using remote means—can only be estimated, but not measured.

KEY WORDS: Algal blooms · Chlorophyll a · Zooplankton

Spatial-Temporal Distribution of the Palinurid and Scyllarid Phyllosoma Larvae in Oman Coastal Water Spatial-Temporal Distribution of the Palinurid and Scyllarid Phyllosoma Larvae in Oman Coastal Water

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Date added: 12/02/2013
Date modified: 12/02/2013
Filesize: 8.07 MB
Downloads: 2200
Spatial-Temporal Distribution of the Palinurid and Scyllarid Phyllosoma Larvae in Oman Coastal Waters
Sergey Khvorov1*, Sergey Piontkovski2, and Elena Popova3
1Marine Science Fisheries Centre, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth
P.O. Box 227, Sultanate of Oman
2College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University
P.O. Box 34, Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman
3Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas, 2, Nakhimov av.-Crimea
99011, Sevastopol, Ukraine

The Bongo Net samples collected between 2005 and 2008 in the Sea of Oman and in the north-western part of the Arabian Sea (near Massirah Island) were analyzed, for a pilot assessment of seasonal and spatial distribution of the phyllosoma larvae. In the samples collected, 84% of all phyllosoma larvae were from the family Palinuridae, while the others were contributed by family Scyllaridae. All larvae of Panulirus homarus were in the first development stage and had a mean body length of 1.30±0.89mm. The phyllosoma larvae of the less abundant family Scyllaridae were in the second, third, and fourth development stages, which had a mean length of 2.3mm, 3.3mm and 4.63mm, respectively. In terms of seasonal changes, the phyllosoma larvae tend to appear in Omani waters in February, reaching their maximum numbers in April. The abundance of phyllosoma P. homarus was as much as twofold higher in the Arabian Sea compared to the Sea of Oman.
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